Archive for May, 2016

Doggie Sale! $20 at San Jose Animal Shelter

Through May 31

Through May 31

There is a major sale for lovable dogs needing forever homes at the San Jose Animal Care Center throughout May.  Until May 31 all full grown dogs (not puppies) are only $20! Even better, any dog who has been at the shelter for more than two weeks is ABSOLUTELY FREE.

I adopted a dog at the shelter last December, and Simon is now a wonderful addition to our family. I can’t recommend the shelter enough. Dogs are spayed/neutered, have their shots, and are microchipped, all for the one very low price. You also get a certificate for a free first vet appointment. My dog Simon is wonderful with children and came home already housetrained and knowing all his commands. Shelter dogs are wonderful dogs and will love you forever.

The San Jose Animal Care Center is a full-service animal shelter serving the cities of San Jose, Milpitas, Cupertino, Los Gatos and Saratoga, located at 2750 Monterey Highway, San Jose.

There are currently four pages of dogs up on their website. Here are just a few who need homes today – for only $20!! Dogs are first come, first serve, so get down to the shelter today!

MEISHA $20 ID#A987556

MEISHA $20 ID#A987556

BONNIE - FREE ID#A988272

BONNIE – FREE ID#A988272

JACK $20 ID#A992511

JACK $20 ID#A992511

 

Radio Girls, by UCSC alumna Sarah-Jane Stratford

Coming June 14

Coming June 14

Summer is almost upon us, and we should all be starting our beach reading lists.  There is a book called Radio Girls that PopSugar recommends for Best 2016 Summer reading, and you should have it on your own list too. The book was written by UC Santa Cruz alumna Sarah-Jane Stratford, and it is one fantastic read.

Radio Girls is the best kind of historical fiction in that it tells a real story with real people, but from a fictional character’s point of view. I am not sure what I initially expected of this book, but it is definitely much more than I had imagined!

It covers part of the story of the beginning years of the BBC. As I read, I started googling the guest speakers they mentioned and found these very real people to be fascinating, but then I googled Hilda Matheson, a prominent character who works at the BBC in the book, and discovered she was a real person too. After discovering that most of the characters were real-life people, I realized this was actually a fairly true story told from a (fictional) assistant’s point of view. This upped my fascination level even higher than it was when I began the book.

I had never read a book that revolved around radio’s beginnings, and it really brought to light not only how much the world changed with that one invention, but how similar the change was then to these new internet days now. There was so much talk of the world becoming a smaller place, and how everyone with access to a radio could now get so much knowledge they had no access to before, and how it would help people who felt alone in the world. These are all things they say about the internet now. As far as we’ve come in the last 100 years, the radio also gave us a huge jump in technology and knowledge and connection with the world.

Sarah-Jane Stratford

Sarah-Jane Stratford

With this knowledge however comes the question of who will control the dissemination of that knowledge. BBC’s beginnings came at the same time as Women’s Suffrage in the UK, and those grumbling times are remarkably similar to today’s political atmosphere. Women’s Rights also meant loss of the men’s complete control of the world, and they certainly were not happy about it. World War I had just ended, governments were reorganizing, and businesses across borders were forming new alliances. The stock market crash in the US had just as great an effect across the Atlantic. There were at least two opposing views on each of these topics, and control of the BBC meant control of the information the world received.

In the middle of all this is young Maisie, our fictional heroine who lands a low-level job at the BBC hoping to find a husband, but instead finds a career and a new life plan. A life plan she could barely comprehend as it wasn’t even a possibility just a few years before. Along with Maisie comes a fictional storyline starring the BBC, Nestle and Siemens, and the Nazis. As Sarah-Jane Stratford mentions in the very informative Author’s Note, the actual storyline is fictional, but many of the events surrounding it are not, and many similar events were taking place.

Stratford earned a degree in History at UCSC and went on to obtain a Masters in Medieval History at the University of York in England. She wrote this book because of her fascination with Hilda Matheson from the BBC, and this fascination is transferred to the reader. She was an amazing, high-level career woman in times when there was no such thing, and she was a lesbian to boot. She is a fantastic role model to young women even in our own times.

And so is our young Maisie, who follows her dreams of being a reporter with various levels of success. But in Maisie’s case as it is always, it doesn’t matter how many times you fall down, it matters how many times you get back up. She takes her role as reporter very seriously, and even takes on some spy traits as she works to save free speech in the UK and retain women’s new rights as well.

This is an outstanding book that gets better and better as it goes along. I love that I learned so much, I love that I’ve developed a great interest in the amazing Hilda Matheson, and I really enjoyed the fictional plot. The fictional plot doesn’t get going until the second half, but spending the first half on Maisie’s moving up the ranks and learning about all the real-life changes that happened in those few short years was worth it all.

Sarah-Jane Stratford is also the author of two previous books, and has also written articles and essays for a range of publications, including The Guardian, The Boston Globe, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Marie-Claire, Bitch, Slate, Salon, Guernica, and BOMB.

Radio Girls will be released June 14. Many thanks to Penguin Books for an advance copy, this book is FIVE STARS without a doubt.

Wings of History Air Museum Free Open House

Wings History Museum
Wings of History Air Museum free open house to the museum and displays Saturday May 14, 2016 from 7:00 am to 3:30 pm.

Airplanes of all kinds, including antique, modern and Warbirds will be on display, along with antique farm equipment and steam engines.

Take a free ride on a tethered balloon between 7:00 am to 9:00 am, weather permitting, wind calm.

Kids get a free airplane ride for those 8 years to 17 years old —  limited space, pre-register.

There will be kids’ activities including model-making and a maze.

Breakfast (from 8am) and lunch (11:00am to 2:00pm) will be available for purchase.

Wings of History Museum
12777 Murphy Avenue, San Martin, 95046
(408) 683-2290

Free Cone Day at Häagen-Dazs

Häagen-Dazs_logoIt is Free Cone Day Tuesday May 10 at participating Häagen-Dazs Shops from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM. You may get one free kiddie size ice cream in either a cup, sugar cone, or cake cone. No, you do not need to be a kid.

Participating Häagen-Dazs Shops:

Valley Fair Mall
2855 Stevens Creek Blvd.
Santa Clara, 95050
(408) 260-8882

Westfield San Francisco Centre
865 Market Street
San Francisco, 94103
(415) 896-1550

AT& T Park
24 Willie Mays Plaza
San Francisco, 94124
(415) 371-0727

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